January 6, 2011

Mac App Store Is Live

Some things to look for as the new store gains traction:
  • Prices begin higher, on average, than current iOS App Store products, but decline as more apps become available in the Mac App Store. Supply and demand. Does this mean software will be worth less over time? No. Easy, one-stop availability means any one author can more easily reach a large audience. More exposure means more sales, making up any loss of revenue due to greater competition and greater selection. Make a good product, hang a shingle, profit!
  • No decline in the availablity of open source software. OSS authors may make their wares available on the Mac App Store with links to off-site source repositories in the descriptive text. The App Store may make OSS more viable than it would otherwise be by putting it on an equal footing, display-wise, as proprietary software.
  • More Mac sales. More apps in the App Store means it becomes easier for even the greenest newbie to find, install and update software for a Mac. Since there is no equivalent for Windows machines, the choice of easier-to-maintain becomes clear. If an unsophisticated user can deal with getting software onto a Windows machine, she can do so even more easily for a Mac at the App Store.
  • The end of Windows ubiquity. This is the long-term play. As more people are exposed to the finer design and integration of Apple hardware, and the ease of use of iOS, Mac OS and their repsective App Stores, the "design matters" meme grows more mainstream. As a result, more buyers become willing to shell out the Apple premium. Eventually many begin to wonder why it hasn't always been this easy to maintain and use computing equipment. A new era of personal computing dawns.

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